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Mommies & Me
kat-howard:

moresongsaboutbuildings:

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      
NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

An inspiration to aspiring dames, broads and good-time girls everywhere. RIP, Ms Stritch.

She was phenomenal. 

kat-howard:

moresongsaboutbuildings:

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      

NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

An inspiration to aspiring dames, broads and good-time girls everywhere. RIP, Ms Stritch.

She was phenomenal. 

queen-of-love-and-beauty:

"I don’t wear makeup so I don’t have to waste like an hour in front of the mirror every morning hahahaha"

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"open books not legs"

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"why have tequila shots when you can have tea?"

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"As always, late with Starbucks"

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"modest is hottest"

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"I’m not like those girls”

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doubleadrivel:

engineeringpoodles:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

Medicine is a poor counter-example for this concept anyway. Doctors go to so many seminars and conferences and classes every year to learn about the latest techniques, treatments and medications so they can give their patients the latest advances in medicine. A doctor who just keeps using the same methods and prescribing the same pills they learned about in med school 20 years ago is a doctor who doesn’t give a shit about their work.

I have a much cuter story that makes the same point:
—-
One day a good friend of mine, Harry invited me over for dinner. It was “pot roast night” and he had been raving about his wife’s secret family recipe and how I would have never tasted a roast so good.Sure enough, as expected, dinner was nothing less than spectacular. But I did notice something peculiar.As the roast was being served on the table and the pot was being opened, I noticed that the roast had been cooked with its ends cut off… Being naïve, I asked the question, “Why are the ends cut off the roast like that?” The answer I got was “I’m not sure, that’s the way my mother used to cook it.” With no further explanation, I enjoyed stuffing my face on this spectacular feast. Harry was right, the roast dinner was absolutely brilliant!A few weeks later, Harry came rushing into my office with a look of excitement on his face. He blurted out, “I must tell you the story of the pot roast….”Last week my wife had her family reunion, and while we were chatting, the question of the famous pot roast came to my mind. I asked Mary’s mother, “Why do you cut the ends of your pot roast that way before you cook it?” She answered, “I’m not really sure, that’s the way my mother taught me to do it.”Luckily the whole family was there and grandma was busy entertaining the grandchildren with stories of the good old days. I finally had a chance to get her attention and ask about the famous family recipe for the pot roast. She started to giggle, which turned into a belly laugh as I told her how her famous recipe had been handed down through the generations and no one was really sure how cutting the ends off the roast made it taste so good.She looked me straight in the eye and said, “Harry, this is the funniest story I have ever heard… I’m glad to hear that my recipe has had such a great response, but the only reason that I used to cut the ends of my roast, was because I didn’t have a pot big enough to fit it in…” “I burst out into fits of laughter with her as she really made my day” said Harry.
—-
I’ve never seen an authenticated source for either the pot roast story or the banana-monkey experiment (probably because I’ve never looked for one) but it’s in the realm of urban legend, it doesn’t really need to be “certifiably true” to teach the lesson.
What makes the phrase “we’ve always done it this way” dangerous is the attitude it conveys. An attitude where we do not question ourselves, our methods, actions, reasons, motivations. “We’ve always done it this way,” comes with the assumption that that answer is reason enough; if we feel free to respond with queries and challenges (“okay but why did we start doing it that way? Can we also do it other ways?”) without fear of censure then the phrase itself loses its threat.
There’s something to be said for respecting tradition. But you cannot fully respect tradition if you are blindly unaware of its history, context, and meaning. Knowing both how and why “we’ve always done it this way” is important for improving and innovating, increasing efficacy and efficiency.
But yeah, it’s hard to fit all of that^^ into a pithy snappy wall quote… :|

doubleadrivel:

engineeringpoodles:

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

Medicine is a poor counter-example for this concept anyway. Doctors go to so many seminars and conferences and classes every year to learn about the latest techniques, treatments and medications so they can give their patients the latest advances in medicine. A doctor who just keeps using the same methods and prescribing the same pills they learned about in med school 20 years ago is a doctor who doesn’t give a shit about their work.

I have a much cuter story that makes the same point:

—-

One day a good friend of mine, Harry invited me over for dinner. It was “pot roast night” and he had been raving about his wife’s secret family recipe and how I would have never tasted a roast so good.

Sure enough, as expected, dinner was nothing less than spectacular. But I did notice something peculiar.

As the roast was being served on the table and the pot was being opened, I noticed that the roast had been cooked with its ends cut off… Being naïve, I asked the question, “Why are the ends cut off the roast like that?” The answer I got was “I’m not sure, that’s the way my mother used to cook it.” With no further explanation, I enjoyed stuffing my face on this spectacular feast. Harry was right, the roast dinner was absolutely brilliant!

A few weeks later, Harry came rushing into my office with a look of excitement on his face. He blurted out, “I must tell you the story of the pot roast….”

Last week my wife had her family reunion, and while we were chatting, the question of the famous pot roast came to my mind. I asked Mary’s mother, “Why do you cut the ends of your pot roast that way before you cook it?” She answered, “I’m not really sure, that’s the way my mother taught me to do it.”

Luckily the whole family was there and grandma was busy entertaining the grandchildren with stories of the good old days. I finally had a chance to get her attention and ask about the famous family recipe for the pot roast. She started to giggle, which turned into a belly laugh as I told her how her famous recipe had been handed down through the generations and no one was really sure how cutting the ends off the roast made it taste so good.

She looked me straight in the eye and said, “Harry, this is the funniest story I have ever heard… I’m glad to hear that my recipe has had such a great response, but the only reason that I used to cut the ends of my roast, was because I didn’t have a pot big enough to fit it in…” “I burst out into fits of laughter with her as she really made my day” said Harry.

—-

I’ve never seen an authenticated source for either the pot roast story or the banana-monkey experiment (probably because I’ve never looked for one) but it’s in the realm of urban legend, it doesn’t really need to be “certifiably true” to teach the lesson.

What makes the phrase “we’ve always done it this way” dangerous is the attitude it conveys. An attitude where we do not question ourselves, our methods, actions, reasons, motivations. “We’ve always done it this way,” comes with the assumption that that answer is reason enough; if we feel free to respond with queries and challenges (“okay but why did we start doing it that way? Can we also do it other ways?”) without fear of censure then the phrase itself loses its threat.

There’s something to be said for respecting tradition. But you cannot fully respect tradition if you are blindly unaware of its history, context, and meaning. Knowing both how and why “we’ve always done it this way” is important for improving and innovating, increasing efficacy and efficiency.

But yeah, it’s hard to fit all of that^^ into a pithy snappy wall quote… :|

'Tell me what happens the first time you see a woman naked.'

'The first time you see a woman naked will not be like you imagined. There will be no love, no trust, no intimacy. You won’t even be in the same room as her.

You won’t get to smile as she undresses you and you undress her. You won’t get to calm her nerves with nerves of your own. You won’t get to kiss her, feeling her lips and the edge of her tongue. You won’t get to brush your fingers over the lace of her bra or count her ribs or feel her heartbeat.

The first time you see a woman naked you will be sitting in front of a computer screen watching someone play at intimacy and perform at sex. She will contort her body to please everyone in the room but her. You will watch this woman who is not a woman, pixelated and filtered and customized. She will come ready-made, like an order at a restaurant. The man on the screen will be bigger than you, rougher than you. He will teach you how to talk to her. He will teach you where to put your hands and he will teach you what you’re supposed to like. He will teach you to take what is yours.

You must unlearn this. You must unlearn this twisted sense of love. You must unlearn the definition of pleasure and intimacy you are being taught. Kill this idea of love, this idea of entitlement, this way of scarring one another.’

this scared me and made me cry and i am almost embarrassed to post this but quite honestly i would rather fight for this rather than anything else.

men and womens value, and the indescribable importance of intimacy

(via fluts)

rydenarmani:

a rant about the women against feminism hashtag

Guys look… Look how adorable amd cute and happymaking

chiavedisol

I love that you post quotes out of the Quran. I love seeing people who are of one faith find solace and validity in others. That makes me incredibly happy. I'm a Hindu, converted from atheism about two years ago, and I was previously an evangelical christian before all of that (ew). I love all my scriptures, but I still find a lot of validity and solace in Islam and even in Christianity now that I know there is much more to it than my parents ever let on. Anyways, you're awesome.

notalwaysluminous:

The Bible— the holy book on which I primarily rely as a practicing Christian— tells us to seek after and to meditate upon anything that is good, true, beautiful, noble, and worthy of praise. Much of that can be found within the scriptures and traditions of other faiths. There is beauty and truth to be found anywhere, and anyone who insists that it can only be found in their own tradition is stunting themselves not only spiritually but as a human being as well. 

hella-lujah:

i love being the radical degenerate queer of the family

modestdemidov:

robinistall:

fish shaming [x]

jesus christ i’ve been waiting for this

I will unfollow each one who will post enthusiastically about fifty shades of gray.

booksandcatslover:

Nothing personal with you, people… but I really can’t stand that book and all the romanticization of abuse that it promotes. 

shortcrazygirl:

lesbianfamilies:

wild-child-fashion:

Last night while I was already on the verge of sleep I suddenly started thinking about parents who teach their kids the “abc’s” before they even start school because it’s “cute” or something along those lines.
Most people don’t know the difference between abc and the alphabet and as someone who…

Im sorry I have to disagree with this.

Yeah I have to disagree as well. I don’t know where you teach first grade at, but in Washington, California, and I’m sure more, if not most states in the US, kids have to know the alphabet before entering kindergarten. They also have to know how to spell their name and tie their own shoes (all of which are ridiculous standards. Not all kids have parents that can afford the time to teach them these things, and no kid develops these skills at the same rate as any other).
I nanny a two year old and with the exception of “LMNOP” she’s got the alphabet down because of the ABC’s. She recognizes each letter and can almost write a good majority of them.
I don’t think there is any “right” way to teach kids the alphabet, as long as they’re learning the letters. And as a child care provider (babysitter, preschool assistant, toddler lead teacher, nanny), I have never met a parent who taught their kid the ABC’s because it’s “cute”. They teach it because they want their kids to learn the alphabet.

your face reminds me of a 1950s housewife for some reason
Anonymous

agentrodgers:

What? C’mon now, don’t be silly!

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I mean, really, I’m not-

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Woah, where’d that come from?

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What am I wearing????

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The fuck is this?!!?!

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The fuck is that?!??!!

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Gee wizz, mister!

compasswaters:

100% of people who tell you you’re too sensitive are saying it because they don’t want to be held responsible for your reaction when they mistreat you

bilt2tumble:

generalgemini-booknerd:

Alright, these are kinda adorable…

Much-MUCH better than sad, tortured, & unfortunate Wee Ones staring at the camera hopelessly. THIS might actually help THEM find homes too.