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Mommies & Me
There is always a saturation point with protest and compassionate response, and this is what the militarized response in Ferguson is banking on—that they can wear out the protest and more strategically, wear out our attention. It’s not that people get bored and move on, it’s that they know we’ll get compassion fatigue and our brains will invoke the Silencing Response, where we want to turn away from things we feel ill-equipped to fix. We have a lot to do now that a compassionate response to injustice has been prompted, and most importantly that includes not shutting down. not turning away because we don’t know what to do. I’m bearing down on bearing witness.

bubbleinhabitor:

Thinking about socially conscious people having kids makes me happy. Like yes, raise your kids to respect others and not shit on their existence.

pretty-period:

More girls should join boys’ teams so it could be a tradition and it wouldn’t be so special.” - 13-year-old Mo’Ne Davis, the 18th girl to play in the Little League World Series in its 68-year history, the FIRST girl to throw a Little League World Series SHUTOUT. Her fastball? 70 MILES PER HOUR. #throwlikeagirl #BlackGirlsROCK

lustrousladies:

Adipositivity Photography

lustrousladies:

Adipositivity Photography

micdotcom:

Yup.
You realize that everything the police are doing in Ferguson is carefully calculated, right? They’re purposely turning peaceful protests into riots. They’re purposely committing violence to incite violence. From saying ‘We won’t be answering 911 calls,’ which is a very clever way to set themselves up to be able to say, ‘We were afraid for our safety - any call could really be an ambush, our lives were in danger’ right down to the camouflage and the military tanks and wearing more body armor than a soldier in a war zone. Its exactly why they’re going for a media blackout - yet allowing certain photos through - they WANT you to see their tanks. They want you to see their riot gear. They WANT you to see a war-zone. They’re trying to sell the world the idea that this community is inherently and constantly a source of violence and turmoil - they want you to think that they [the police] are being attacked daily in a place so vicious they need full body armor. You know why? Because then, at the end of the day, you might just be able to believe the story they’re going to spin. They’re going to tell you that this (white) officer goes to work in this war zone every day - that he spends every working moment in constant fear for his life. They’re going to tell you that Michael Brown attacked this officer. And then they’re going to bring up everything that has happened in the aftermath and try to use it to convince you that he shot that little boy because he was afraid for his life. They’re setting up a defense. You mark my words, they’re trying to set up a defense.

My mom’s take on what’s going on in Ferguson (via actualbanshee)

Your mom isn’t wrong. That’s why it’s so important to keep the signal going. Too many are silenced with lies and fear and if they cannot speak then we have to do it for them.

(via auntpol)

aconissa:

I am so sick of people trying to claim 50 Shades of Grey will not be able to have a negative effect on society because it’s “just a book”. The Bible was just a book. The Communist Manifesto was just a book. Mein Kampf, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1984, The Quran, freaking Harry Potter were all “just books”. If you keep saying literature and media don’t have the potential to change countries, or cultures, or the world, then you’re just deluding yourself.

The first picture is what Aria’s hair looks like now. Its by no means long, but its very much in her eyes.

Aria hates having her hair brushed or put up (which is obvious by the 3 middle pictures).

Recently my wife commented that she really really needed a haircut on a picture on Facebook. I agree. However, someone in the extended family (who has never met Aria) disagrees. Now, several people in the family have mentioned that they don’t like her hair short. They’ve joked and teased us about it and, while annoying, is mostly harmless(as long as it’s directed at us and not at Aria).
Well this particularly family member decided to throw out “she doesn’t need a haircut, mommy.” To me… That’s a little too much. Its fine to throw out your preferences, as inconsequential as they are, but when you tell me what my child does and doesn’t need is where i ‘m pretty done.

Meghan commented and very politely said that she did indeed need it cut out of her eye and usually fights having it fixed up. Well then the family member commented “You seriously want me to believe that someone that sweet can raise a ruckus over having her hair brused and put up in a little pony tail. 😀” she’s never met Aria. Ever. Yes, I know my child. I’m with her every day. I know what she does and doesn’t act like when faced with a comb and a hairbow. So I posted the middle three pictures. She backed down and I’m glad for that.

But I’ve gotten fed up with everyone acting like their preferences for my daughter’s appearance a) matter and b) are going to be taken seriously when their reasons are thinly veiled misogynistic views. Why have a functional haircut when you can have Longer Hairrrr? Why have a *gasp* a /boyish/ haircut when you can put your precious little princess through hours of torture every day for the sake of girlish beauty standards? I don’t have a problem with anyone who keeps their girls hair long when they’re young…. But my daughter has fine hair, a sensitive scalp, and intensely dislikes having her hair fussed with. So long hair is not something I’m concerned with. I will keep her hair as short as I damn well please until Aria is old enough to express interest in long hair and make the decision to sit for having it brushed every day and put up when it needs to be.

camouflaged-girl:

I have no problem with a woman, such as in the first photo, breastfeeding in public. Shes covered, minding her own business and not disturbing anyone. If your child is hungry and you breastfeed with a nursing cover, blanket, or scarf, I believe no one should have the right to bother you.

I do, however, have a problem with seeing people publicly breastfeed such as in the second photo. She makes no effort to cover her breasts, nor nipples. There is no respect for anyone in the surrounding area that, if they walk anywhere near, are forced to see her completely exposed breast and nipple, and if the child finishes eating and unlatches, shes just sitting there with her breast completely out.

Putting on a nursing cover or blanket is not difficult, expensive, or time consuming. It’s a simple gesture of respect for those around you, and if you put forth that respect you will recieve it back.

Ok…. First off I’d like to say that I completely agree with some of the other commenters in that a) you aren’t “forcing” someone to look at your breast. Because no matter how exposed a mother is while breastfeeding…. All she’s after is to breastfeed her baby. Is she hopping around in front of you swinging her breast in your face wildly? No. So avert your eyes if its not something you want to see.(its really not your business to be staring anyway). B) I’ve never seen anyone breastfeed like in the 2nd picture either. Generally the closer the baby is (without smushing their face/nose to you) the better the latch and the easier it is to nurse comfortably. And even if they were, they’re not out to show off their titties. When people breastfeed in public it’s because their child requires food, comfort, or needs to nurse to sleep. No one is out to poke out your eyes with an out of control nipple.

That being said, covered breastfeeding is fucking hard. Its uncomfortable, a lot if babies can’t stand being covered while they eat. My daughter used to refuse to be covered and let me tell you its much less awkward to nurse uncovered or less covered than to have a baby rip the blanket off, you make a dive for it, the baby unlatches, and guess what? A wild boob appears! The idea that covering yourself = respect for others is really screwed up. So, no… Wearing a cover to be “respectful” to passing strangers is not something I’m ever gonna do and not something any person who breastfeeds should feel obligated to do. I don’t judge people who choose to cover completely nor do I judge those who don’t. I like to cover myself a little (like maybe wearing a tank top and a shirt over it and just pulling the top shirt up to breastfeed) but that’s just my preference and not something I feel the need to force on others. You say the woman in the first picture is minding her own business. Is someone who breastfeeds uncovered not minding their own business? Like do you really believe they’re actively trying to expose themselves and literally “forcing” the people around them to look at their breasts? Its not anyone’s job to actively work towards keeping others comfortable. Yes, its not expensive to buy a cover. Sure, it’s simple to put on… But its not necessarily comfortable or feasible all the time. Its not always good for the baby. Sometimes covers are great…. Like for distracted eaters in a loud or busy environment. But on a hot day at the park? Why should anyone suffer through the heat or put their baby through the risk of overheating out of “a simple gesture of respect” to the people around her? Asking someone to cover up just for the sake of people passing by (and I’m just talking about strangers here because really if you’re in someone’s social or familial circle and can’t stand to see a little boob in the context of feeding their child then you can easily elect to not be around them when they are) is like saying you should only eat vegan in public (I mean its simple enough to only ever order salads … Right?) Lest a vegan see you eat meat and be offended. If you are out in public you should be able to handle seeing people go about normal day to day activities without having a fit over it. You can disagree with peoples choices but as long as they’re not hurting anyone its really none of your business.

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.
Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…
Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.
Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this imag

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.

Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…

Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.

Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this imag

nystic:

this is important please spread

samjoonyuh:

Perspective. 

doggydowner:

vaegrant:

IM SO TIRED OF ART OF FEMALE CHARACTERS IN WHICH THE SHIRT JUST MAGICALLY ADHERES TO THE UNDERSIDE OF THEIR BOOBS AND ALSO GOES BETWEEN CLEAVAGE

THAT IS NOT AT ALL HOW SHIRTS WORK PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF GOOD JUST GO LOOK AT A REAL LIFE GIRL AND NOTICE HOW HER SHIRT DOES NOT DO THAT

end the boob socks

Neve Campbell